Life in the ‘Iron Lung’- Polio and the modern respirator

Respirator used for polio patients

Respirator used for polio patients

The exhibit “Life in ‘The Lung': Polio and the Modern Respirator” explains the causes, history, mysteries, and effects of the dreaded polio virus and the large, metal contraption that was used to keep its victims alive–the respirator or “iron lung.”

Polio, or more properly poliomyelitis, was one of the most feared diseases of the twentieth century. This exhibit presents the evolution of the iron lung in drawings and illustrations from an 1864 design by Alfred F. Jones, to the modern respirator of J. H. Emerson, an example of which is on display in the gallery. An educational video on the development of the polio vaccine accompanies the exhibit, as well as a time-line that traces the history of the disease from its earliest evidence in ancient Egypt to its eradication from the Western hemisphere in the late 1970s. Accompanying the video are twenty historic photographs and text explaining the mass polio immunization in the Youngstown area. Youngstown was one of the first cities in the United States to conduct a massive immunization using the Sabin oral vaccine. This story is presented in great detail, which adds a local flavor to the exhibit.

interior view of respirator

interior view of respirator

3 Responses to Life in the ‘Iron Lung’- Polio and the modern respirator

  1. [...] To see an Iron Lung respirator used for polio patients and to learn more about polio, visit the Rose Melnick Medical Museum’s online exhibit “Life in the Iron Lung: Polio and the modern respirator.” [...]

  2. I would argue that the picture of ‘the modern respirator’ looks quite different!

  3. [...] To see an Iron Lung respirator used for polio patients and to learn more about polio, visit the Rose Melnick Medical Museum’s online exhibit “Life in the Iron Lung: Polio and the modern respirator.” [...]

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